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Posted by Kelly Judd, Aug 16 2013 12:23PM

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Sports Massage course vs. Sports Massage Techniques course?

I've just been accepted to do VCTC Sports Massage course Level 4. I don't really treat many people with injuries - but a few I do treat have shoulder/back/sciatica problems. However I've just signed up to do voluntary work at a sports event.

Its been a few years since I've done a years course and feel a bit nervous about doing this course as I've heard it is one of the hardest courses to do.

In my research I've found a days course (accredited) for Sports Massage Technique, which I'm assuming will show me the moves that I need to go deeper without all the in-depth nitty gritty knowledge.

I'm now unsure what to do. Does anyone have any advice/guidance on these courses (pro's vs. con's).

Any advice gratefully received.

Nicki Lee
Aug 16 2013 12:35PM
Good questions! I don't have a definitive answer, but here are some thoughts:
Sports Massage, technically, is massage for sports persons. They may be elite full time athletes, or much more often, people who do some amount of sport while they hold a day job. For these people, a lot of their injuries or issues may come from the day job (sitting in front of a computer for hours, say).
Sports Massage techniques, last time I looked and as taught, were *mostly* basic massage techniques - the difference in a year long course is really 'how you think' - invaluable for assessing and treating appropriately.
There is a lot of confusion and misunderstanding of the differences between Remedial Massage and Sports Massage. Some people say they are the same. In my own opinion, Sports Massage is what you do for an athlete, Remedial is for the rest of us.
Having said that, *most* remedial courses will include advanced massage techniques that many sports massage courses do not include.
(Have to add a disclaimer here: I am a Sports Therapist who specialised in Remedial Massage, and also teach workshops in various advanced massage techniques).
From what you are saying, if you only intend to work casually and occasionally with athletes, your basic massage with additional techniques might be good for you. Of course I think everyone should keep learning, it makes you a better therapist for all your clients, but pick something you are really interested in.
Very best of luck! (Feel free to email or phone if you want to discuss anything further)
Nicki
Mike Colquhoun
Aug 18 2013 10:46AM
Hi Kelly

I've worked as a remedial masseur for twenty five years and in the general scheme of things I know it can't go on much longer so have put a guidance to my knowledge on my web site.
Remedial Massage is not that hard to learn but the experience to understand takes time, the reward for persisting with it? Well years ago when the improvement in a Patient's quality of life left me walking on air for three days I was convinced me that this was for me. Just occasionally this still happens, last weekend I had a Twenty year old Patient tell me 'If it wasn't for you I wouldn't be at Loughborough, I would have given up sport.' And next day a ninety year old at a wedding I was attending said 'This man saved my life when I met him I couldn't breath, I had to have a car to get to him, now? well next month I'm off on a cruise.'
If this is what interests you its all free, though it will take hours of reading and thinking to make use of it. I have even put three downloads free, a booklet on Lymph, 18 leaflets on a variety of subjects and a notice about the trust required between Therapist and Patient 'Please Read' on it. Especially the download 'Please Read' which is an essential for any Masseur working with repeat Patients who have not been for a while.
With this knowledge you should be in a better position to assess the courses that are being offered.
All at http://muskelym.co.uk/
Hope this helps, yours aye Mike.
Kelly Judd
Aug 18 2013 11:38AM
Thank you both for your advice it is much appreciated and has given me food for thought. Kelly

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