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Posted by Jane Hopwood, Aug 10 2010 6:50PM

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Is my business a centre, a clinic, or a shop

Hi, I am opening my new business. It is in a retail shop unit. I have 1 treatment room and a reception area. I will be working alone. I will be selling products when able but otherwise I will have to put a closed - "treatment in progress" sign up when working. What I guidance on is ....

What do I describe my premises as:-

e.g. come to my clinic
come to my treatment centre
come to my shop

I will be working alone so clinic and centre do not sound right. Please everyone give opinions or advice.
Thanks Jane Hopwood
Roushan Martens
Aug 10 2010 7:25PM
I think clinic sounds fine, actually - and it's a more apt description than shop, from what I can see, giving people a better idea of what to expect. Someone else might have a better idea than me, though!
Jane Hopwood
Aug 10 2010 9:22PM
Thanks for giving a reply. I am really grateful that you took the time to help me. I also think clinic sounds the best and is appropriate. But I said to someone come to my clinic and they looked at me agast as if "clinic". The word association obviously played a different part for them. Clinic sounds so clinical. I agree as above it is appropriate but it doesn't seem to have the right response when I say it. Please help. Jane
Angelina Kelly
Aug 11 2010 12:04PM
Hi Jane,

How about Healing Centre? That incorporates all and gives the public a perception of a broad based service.

Hope this helps.

Angelina Kelly
Jane Hopwood
Aug 11 2010 4:50PM
Hi thanks. Healing centre sounds good too. Anymore suggestions would be gladly received as I am so undecided. Thanks for help it is much appreciated. Jane
Angelina Kelly
Aug 11 2010 5:31PM
Hi Jane,

The more people you ask, the more confused you will get. I suggest you trust your instinct on this one because you know, deep inside, which is right. To help you in making a decision I suggest the Bach Flower Remedy Cerato which will clarify your own mind for you.

Good luck

Angelina Kelly
Jane Hopwood
Aug 12 2010 9:14AM
Thanks and best wishes Angelina
Gillian Kenyon
Sep 7 2010 12:02PM
In marketing psychology there is a term called 'encoded closure' - this means that a person perceives something in the way that you intend but not necessarily at face value.

It is all about perceptions, and these are the deepest and most fundamental things we possess as humans. They are also the most difficult to change.

When marketing ourselves, we need to be careful NOT to state or imply that we can 'Heal Illness' or that we are practising to 'Treat Medically' without absolute and undisputable proof.

The terms we use should be those that meet general perceptions. Having discussed with a number of my clients, here is what they have come up with so far:

Clinic - implies to most people a place for repair & medical treatment that may or may not be a specifically built and designed location ie Harley Street Clinic (houses/rooms used by GP's etc) - albeit that clinic is also used by Politicians who hold 'clinics' to discuss political issues with their constituents

Shop - a place you go to buy something and leave - anything from a bin bag to a stereo - but also used by garages who describe themselves as having 'repair shops'

Salon - a place visited for Beautification. Usually a specific location but may also be within another centre such as a sports centre

Spa - a place with water based therapies - but also used by Salons who do not have water based therapies to convey that they are a place of relaxation. May also be within another centre such as a sports centre

Rooms - used by senior medical consultants to describe their public places of consultation ie Mr Jone's Rooms

Practice - used by GP's to describe their premises, ie West Street Practice

Hope this helps.
Jane Hopwood
Sep 7 2010 3:53PM
Wow thanks for that. I have mused about these terms and have the same ideas. Clinic sounds too medical, whilst salon and spa sound more like pampering relaxation. I did think about treatment rooms but I only have one. Come to my treatment room does not sound like I have a business premise. I have a retail shop premise that I have turned into a reception area with 1 treatment room. Do you think if I said come to my holistic treatment practice sounds ok. I don't how the word holistic is perceived or whether it would be confusing. I want people to get the right message - that I am trained professional that can treat specific muscular problems as well as give an overall thorough body massage for their general well-being. i also offer hopi ear candling and will soon be a qualified relexologist. I don't what my premise description to give the wrong impression and I want it to recognised as a professional health treatment. I know I may sound like I am being to "nit picking" but I want to it to sound right. I want people to understand from what I call it - what it is. I value your definitions and would appreciate your personal view along with anyone else willing to give their views.

Thanks again, Jane
Angelina Kelly
Sep 7 2010 4:07PM
Hi Jane,

How about calling the premises

Jane Hopwood
Holistic Practitioner

Would that work for you?
Gillian Kenyon
Sep 7 2010 5:54PM
When I started in Therapies, I too used the word 'Holistic' in promotional literature, website, adverts etc etc nowadays I don't bother. The only people who are impressed by its use are other therapists.

As my husband pointed out - he wouldn't go to a 'Holistic' practitioner but he would go to a 'Health and Wellbeing' Practitioner.

Why not do a straw poll of the non-therapists you know (not people who already know you practise holistic therapy either)and see what they come up with? Just describe the things you do and see what would make them visit you. Get them to list all words they would use to describe what you do

It may prove quite enlightening.
Jane Hopwood
Sep 7 2010 9:10PM
Thanks for all your help. This a great forum for us. Jane

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